THE PROBLEM

Why is an experience like Tolerance in Motion so important?

Consider what is going on in communities across America right now:

As horrific as these acts were, they can seem remote to today’s young people because they took place many years ago, in countries many thousands of miles away. But we need only look around at today’s headlines to see that our society is not immune from violence and hate.

The history of man is the history of crimes, and history can repeat. So information is a defense. Through this we can build, we must build, a defense against repetition. -Simon Wiesenthal
5,796


Just last year, there were 5,796 hate crimes reported in the United States
50%


50% of all hate crimes are racially motivated
1 in 4


About 1 in 4 school-aged children reports being bullied

The goal of this unique mobile experience is to prompt each visitor to think about the consequences of action and inaction throughout history, and begin to ask two simple but powerful questions: What’s at stake? How can I make a difference?

The stories of brave young people who move from being “bystanders” to “upstanders” during important, but often disturbing, moments in the past – and present - will populate the museum. Visitors will learn about small choices that made a difference. They will also learn how their personal choices matter.

Tolerance in Motion will reach thousands of young people in their own communities enabling them to share this unique educational experience with their families, who might not otherwise have a chance to experience these powerful lessons.

So, why is Tolerance in Motion so important?

Because if we do nothing, we fail our children, our community, and ourselves.